Graph showing genetic admixture for groups by % of genetic contribution by ancestors from specific regions

Source: http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_Ish7688voT0/TOAbjajWtcI/AAAAAAAAC40/GmUk005OYlU/s1600/ADMIXTURE10.jpeg

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Background on the process of diluted gene fragments passing from generation to generation

Here are some good resources to explain gene fragments passed down from a common ancestor to generation to generation.

http://www.isogg.org/wiki/Identical_By_Descent_segment

http://www.isogg.org/wiki/Wiki_Welcome_Page

http://www.isogg.org/wiki/Relative_Finder#Thresholds_for_relationship_matches

http://www.isogg.org/wiki/Autosomal_DNA_tools

There is an interesting user-controlled animation here:

http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/begin/tour/

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Geographical Origin of E1b1b1c1a M84

Given that the Time of the Most Recent Common Ancestor M84 was about 1515 BCE  (+/-650 years), it is hard to pinpoint the exact location of his birth. However, scientists estimate that it was within a region of about 20,000 sq km that stretched southwest to the Mediterranean from just over the Turkish/Syrian border at about Harran (home of Abraham).

By comparison, that is an area about the same size as Israel, Sardinia, Sicily or Massachusetts; twice the size of Lebanon or Cyprus; and 4 times the size of PEI but 1/4 the size of Ireland or the island of Newfoundland. It is also slightly larger than the triangular area from Toronto to Kingston to Ottawa.

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Geographical Associations of Chromosomes

My chromosomes can be shown to be in common with the pool of individuals of specific geographic regions who have been tested. In theory, my genetic makeup should be 75% Western European–mother (50%) and my father’s mother (25%). However, it is only 45% which means that my English mother and Scottish grandmother would have some explaining to do, were they still alive.

Since our narrow current quest is to explain my “orphan” grandfather, I have extracted all Western European from the admixtures calculated from each chromosome, and dubbed the residual to be 100%. The non-Western European contributions distribute themselves as follows, although the weighting in each chromosome varies significantly. I will add that table when I can get it to present clearly here.

Removing 100% of Western Europe
New Weighting

East_European 29.6%
West_European
Mediterranean 44%
Neo_African 0.2%
West_Asian 11.3%
South_Asian 2.3%
Northeast_Asian 1.0%
Southeast_Asian 0.7%
East_African 0.5%
Southwest_Asian 6.7%
Northwest_African 3.5%
Palaeo_African 0.4%
100%

Source: 23andMe Admixture Analysis

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Pick Hypothesis – Family Tree + DNA Match

March 26, 2012

Today was the first confirmation of a DNA match for the Pick hypothesis derived from the Mihailovici family tree.

An ftDNA match with me by the name of Jewell Betty Andersen turns out to have Pick as her maiden name.  At this point I know no more about her than that.  I have asked the manager of her file–a Doctor and PhD–for her specifics and family tree information. That may fill in pertinent gaps–1890 to present–in the Mihailovici tree, particularly for the family members gone missing in action after immigrating to the US. If the trees complement one another and there is still a male MIA fitting our parameters then that will be Frank.

ftDNA proposes us as 4th cousins within a range of 3rd-5th cousins.  This would make our common ancestor either Frank’s father or grandfather since we may be once removed.

We share 35.75 cMs and the longest fragment is 11.38 cMs.

There are

It turns out that in ftDNA there are two other genetic matches that include Pick as names in their family  trees.  They are:

  • Elizabeth Jeanette James
  • B. Ann Carlton Oppenheimer

The 5 of us, including Daniela, share multiple fragments on multiple chromosomes.

 

March 10, 2012

Of the Hora/Mihailovici family tree options the most probable is the Pik/Pick family.

Ship passenger manifest records showed an uncle and nephew arriving in New York in 1906. Interestingly both appeared to be named Franz Pick.

This does not conform to the available family tree information. The uncle’s age conforms to the date of birth for Leopold PICK (1866). of to Gabriel WIEN
Leopold PICK Josef (Pepo) WIEN Francizka Pick

Rationale for thinking that there is a strong possibility that Francizka (Franz) Pick is Frank McCallum.
• From Josef Pike there is a multi-generational reoccurrence, in various forms, of the name Franziska/Franz/Francis for males and females. In three generations the Pick males married women with the name Franziska.
• March 20/21, 1906 the ship Le Champagne / Le Bretagne from Le Havre on March 1 arrived at Ellis Island, New York. The copy of the ship’s manifest (attached) at lines 18 & 19 identified two Slovak Pick males, Franz aged 16 and one aged 38. The younger seems to be identified as the nephew of the older, but that is somewhat problematic as the names and the dates would appear to be father and son. The name of the elder male is not given as being different – odd. In subsequent typed records both are named Franz. However, Franz’s father was Leopold.
• The dates would make Franz born in 1890 which is generally consistent with the family tree and with Frank McCallum’s birth date although neither has been independently verified. In some records Frank did use 1890 as his birth year.
• The ship’s manifest said that the two men were heading out to Nebraska and to Rock Spring Wyoming to join relatives, specifically John Pick. There is a street address which has not yet been confirmed.
• Cousin Eric Josef (Beppo) PICK b. 1898, died in Connecticut leaving named descendants who are presumably in the US. We have no indication of when he entered the US. It does suggest a family interest in America.
• The relationship tree between Daniela and Ian would appear to be supportable by the quantity of cMs (61.6) larger than 3 cM .
• GEDmatch suggested Daniela and Ian are 3.9 generations to MRCA. In this Pick hypothesis there are 4 generations between Daniela and the MRCAs and 5 generations between the MRCAs and Ian

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Proposed Cousins MASTER List – These Cousin Relationships Are Probable But Remain To Be Verified & The Links Are Unknown

As more have their DNA analyzed there are more cousins being proposed by various organizations. I am currently using 23andMe, GEDmatch and ftDNA. As well, I am using MyHeritage for family tree (GEDCOM) development. there are others but these are the primary ones. I will update the list from time to time.

I have decided to put up this master list of the most promising names in order to attract others who are searching and may have parts of the puzzle that we don’t have. Note that searches of specific family trees–such as the current most promising family tree managed by 4th cousin Daniela Mihailovici–will get their own postings.

For Frank’s descendants coming to this page, remember that these matches–out of necessity–are to me and to Merle, Kevin and Brian since it is my DNA that was used. This means that all Frank’ and Molly’s descendants may be related but that since half my DNA is from my English mother then other descendants of Frank and Molly may NOT be related to these cousins. If one other of my cousins (Frank’s descendents) were to have their DNA tested then we could cross compare and determine if the DNA that matches each of these proposed cousins comes from Frank or Molly. That would reduce the search time required by weeding out those who are not related to Frank. I’m unaware of any other of Frank’s descendants having their DNA tested other than me, Brian, David and Jon.

ftDNA

2nd Cousin – 4th Cousin Step Match

Charlotte Kirk Lazell – contact established
Sandra (Raskin) Curcuru – contact established

3rd Cousin – 5th Cousin Step Match

Alexis Hillary Frankel – contact established
Brian Scott Politzer
Mitchell Adley Leon – contact established
Juri Alperovich – contact established via 3rd party cousin
Jewell Betty Andersen (nee Pick)  – contact established via 3rd party

Sasha Emily Ganz – contact established via 3rd party cousin
Ralph F Rothschild – contact established
Julie Bernsen Brook – contact established
Robin Kasch
Jamie Elyse Merriman-Cohen – contact established
Rayna Gillman – contact established
Gregory Lee Steinhauer  – contact established
Roger Wright Lamson
William Alan Schubert
Shirley Jean Collins Beane
Marsha Spector – contact established via 3rd party cousin
Helene Shulman Lorenz
Helmut Schwab
William Morris Yoffee – contact established
Harvey Morris Kabaker – contact established
Fred A Schreier
David Stephen Senzel – contact established
Gil Bardige
Sally Mizroch – contact established
Beatrice Ann Witter
Valerie Bunch Hollinger
Terri /Alexander Kahan

23andMe – 3rd-4th Cousin

Eugene Yurtsev – contact established
Alexander Lifanov – contact established
Karen Aziz
Nathanael Eisenberg

All of the names posted are unproven, unless otherwise indicated. They will be added to our GEDCOM and will be appropriately “qualified”.

NOTE: If anyone named above would prefer to be removed from the list, please let me know. The information posted above is available from other web sites that require members to opt in so that they can benefit from matching DNA analysis and family trees/GEDCOMs. Nonetheless, I wish to establish friendly relations with newly found relatives. We can agree to disagree later, once we really get to know each other!

This addition originated from my son, David, who opened up this DNA Pandora’s box. He pointed out to me the relative importance of propriety and enthusiasm. He deserves the credit as well as his mother who must have brought him up well.

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4th Cousin Daniela (Hora) Mihailovici and Her Family Tree – February 2012 Developments

UPDATE: March 10, 2012
So far the two names with the greatest promise are Pick and Rosenfeld, both families had members who immigrated through New York in the 1900 -10 yrs or + 6 years time frame.

An initial attempt to contact members of the Rosenfeld family has not yet yielded any contact.

See a separate posting for the Picks.

January 16, 2012 was a major development in our search for Frank’s roots and living relatives. I found a possible 4th cousin by the name of Daniela (Hora) Mihailovici. She manages a family tree that has more than 3,300 names on it. I am going through the tree to find branches with individuals who immigrated to the United States around 1890-1905. To date the most promising branches–at the time of immigration–are Pick and Rosenfeld. Eventually I will post the names of living descendants in the hope that someone can provide more information that will either validate or invalidate their inclusion as persons of interest.

Also, I’m attempting to find an easy and “clean” method of including promising names with our family tree on My Heritage Family Tree Builder. I want to mark them indicating that their inclusion is tentative since My Heritage makes regular evaluations in order to match up family trees that otherwise might be unaware of the existence of other family trees with the same people on them.

Names from Daniela’s tree that we are currently searching are:

SURNAMES – Strelinger, Pick, Brugler, Lorand, Landesman, Rosenfeld, Heitler/Hora.

FIRST NAMES – Francis, Frances, Frank; For his mother there is a high probability that the name is a variation on: Julia Yulia,YULIYA, Gyula.

FEMININE FORMS: Various LANGUAGES: Julia (Biblical), Júlia (Slovak), Julija (Slovene), Júlia, Juli, Juliska (Hungarian), Iulia (Romanian), Yuliya (Bulgarian), Julija (Croatian), Julia, Julita (Polish), YULIA, YULIYA (Russian) Julitta (History), Iúile (Irish), Giulia, Giulietta (Italian), Julija (Lithuanian), Júlia, Julinha (Portuguese), Julia (Scandinavian),Julia (Spanish), Iulia, Julia (Ancient Roman),

MASCULINE FORMS: Yuli, Yuliy

With those names we are assuming emigration from Eastern Europe to America through New York in the 1890s. American city locations include the regions of New York, Detroit and Chicago.

DNA comparison through GEDmatch has turned up a 3rd or 4th cousin, Daniela Mihailovici from Haifa, who has access to a family tree of more than 3,200 names. We have not had much time to determine what the route between us might be. Dana has suggested the name Landesman on her side might be the link. I have been poking around on her family tree but need her help to do more. In the meantime I have added a few of the names to our family tree on MyHeritage and it has connected me to yet other family trees which I am now exploring and examining with the site administrators.

My DNA connection with Daniela is quite strong with 11 segments over 10 chromosomes and a total of 61.6 cMs, the second most that has turned up to date for me. Naturally, she and I do not share the same haplogroup, so our connection could be either through my great grandmother or great grandfather. I have not been able to make a connection with the only stranger with an even stronger linkage.

I hope to be adding more confirmed information in March.

DNA comparisons can be made on GEDmatch, 23andMe and soon on ftDNA.

If you would like to know more details before then, then email me at ian@z33z.com .

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Sources: DNA Basics Explained

It is an oxymoron to state that DNA is complex. Fortunately, if you focus on the area that is important to you and if you use some of the many excellent resources that are available, you can understand what you need and apply it effectively.

Well that’s the theory. Stumbling is both frustrating and richly rewarding. After all, it is only about life and death, and so we might as well enjoy the ride.

As we come across resources that are reliable and have helped me, we will add them here.

It is also worth noting that we cannot assume that any “fact” or interpretation will be definitive for all time. DNA research is growing new knowledge at an exponential rate. The increasing number of people having their DNA analyzed is contributing to that.

It is also worth noting that what appears to be bona fide interpretation and analysis may not be reliable. Enthusiastic amateurs like me, without the rigour of peer review, can post anything and make it sound credible. Others post “analysis” which is really opinion or speculation. Still others, like me, conduct their research from a particular interest base which either corrupts their findings or states them in a way which is misleading because they do not take the time to qualify their findings or to put them in the appropriate context. Alas and, occasionally, mea culpa.

All of the retail DNA labs that I have checked out seem to have very good explanatory information. some of it is not so easy to find. There are other organizations, like the ones that I will list below, which provide great services as well, but many of them are hybrid blog/peer review so be careful about how you use information that you find there if it is critically important to you. Verify.

Retail Labs
23andMe (mine)
FTDNA

Information Sources
ISOGG International Society of Genetic Genealogy http://www.isogg.org/

Comments (3)

Three different Y-chromosomes (E1b1b, J2, J1) are strongly common to modern Jews & Mediterranean populations with a strong Phoenician footprint

3 different Y-chromosomes (E1b1b, J2, J1) are strongly common to Ancient Hebrews, Phoenicians and Samaritans.

Genographic scientists in the American Journal of Human Genetics (AJHG-D-08-00725R2) shows that they left some people their genes as well. The study finds that as many as one in 17 men in the Mediterranean basin may have a Phoenician as a direct male-line ancestor.
NOTES: To view the publication in full: http://www.cell.com/AJHG/fulltext/S0002-9297(08)00547-8

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Research into Relationship Between Sephardic Jews and Phoenicians

PRELIMINARY NOTES
Research into Relationship Between Sephardic Jews and Phoenicians

Thesis: There would appear to be a relationship between Phoenicians and ancient Hebrews from around the time of Solomon that stretches as far away as Cadiz in Spain. Is it true? If so, why?

1. Cadiz on the west coast of Spain/Andalusia Founded by Phoenicians; 1104 BC http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadiz
2. From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sephardi_Jews#Language
“Evidence which suggests Jewish connections with the Iberian Peninsula includes:
• References in the books of Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, I Kings, and Jonah to the country of Tarshish, which is thought by many to have been located in modern southern Spain (in ancient Tartessus).
• A signet ring found at Cadiz, dating from the 8th-7th century BC. The inscription on the ring, generally accepted as Phoenician, has been interpreted by a few scholars to be “paleo-hebraic.” “
• An amphora dating from at least the first century AD found in Ibiza, which bears imprints of two Hebrew characters.
• Several early Jewish writers wrote that their families had lived in Spain since the destruction of the first temple. The famous Don Isaac Abravanel (1407–1508) stated that the Abravanel family had lived on the Iberian Peninsula for 2,000 years.
Gadir (Phoenician: גדר), the original name given to the outpost established here by the Phoenicians, means “wall, compound”, or, more generally, “walled stronghold”. The Punic dialect lent this word, along with many others, to the Berber languages, where it was nativised as agadir meaning “wall” in Tamazight and “fortified granary” in Shilha; it appears as a common place name in North Africa.[4] The name of the Israeli town of Gedera has a similar etymology.
The city was originally founded as Gadir (Phoenician גדר “walled city”) by the Phoenicians, who used it in their trade with Tartessos, a city-state believed by archaeologists to be somewhere near the mouth of the Guadalquivir River, about thirty kilometres northwest of Cadiz. (Its exact location has never been firmly established.)

Cadiz is the most ancient city still standing in Western Europe.[1] Traditionally, its founding is dated to 1104 BC[5] although no archaeological strata on the site can be dated earlier than the 9th century BC. One resolution for this discrepancy has been to assume that Gadir was merely a small seasonal trading post in its earliest days.

One of the city’s notable features during antiquity was the temple dedicated to the Phoenician god Melqart. (Melqart was associated with Hercules by the Greeks.) According to the Life of Apollonius of Tyana, the temple was still standing during the 1st century. Some historians, based in part on this source, believe that the columns of this temple were the origin of the myth of the pillars of Hercules.[7]

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