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The Lost Have Been Found! Journey’s End! Perhaps. Maybe.

We are convinced that we have found Frank “McCallum’s” parents!  Hard to believe.  DNA testing has been the key resource.

A short summary:

  • Frank was born October  7, 1890 not October 27, 1891 as he believed.
  • He was born in Saginaw, Michigan not Detroit as he believed.  He did live in Detroit for a number of years.
  • Frank’s  mother was Juliana Lugiewicz who married Joseph Franckowiak in 1892 in Saginaw. Clara Lugiewicz, who Frank put on his WWI Military Attestation as his Next Of Kin, was his aunt, Julia’s brother Andrew’s wife.  From the beginning of this eight year search we had wondered if Clara was Frank’s mother.  His mother, Julia, died in 1911 of tuberculosis, which–we believe–is why he named his Aunt Clara as his NOK.  Juliana was born in 1867 in Germany/Poland, immigrating to Saginaw in 1884.
  • Frank’s father was Carl Henry Weil from Randegg, Konstanz, Baden-Württemberg, Germany.  It is a 50 minute drive from Zurich, Switzerland.  He and a handful of brothers immigrated to Saginaw/Toledo from 1884. They set up a number of fruit wholesale and grocery retail businesses. Eventually, in the early 1890s he moved to Chicago.  Then they moved into the cardboard and paper business running Cromwell Paper Co.
  • The Weil family of Randegg has a celebrated history including many highly respected Rabbis.  One family history goes back to 1135.
  • It has been quite a search, over 4 continents and four thousand years.  It has been very rewarding.
  • Frank had ten half siblings.  Three of Julia’s children died young. Meeting many living cousins has been quite wonderful.  This continues.

There is a great deal that we do not yet know about Frank’s background, including where he picked up the name McCallum.  We have some clues but no evidence yet.  It appears that he lived with his mother and step-father for a number of years, even up to 1900.

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DNA / Genealogical Comparison Guidance

Can you suggest texts that explain how to read chromosome segments so as to determine family tree branches?  A utility or  app into which to plug selected chromosome data and generate probabilities would be ideal. GEDmatch does not currently provide the triangulation utility which did help locate and populate potential branches which could then be matched against known family trees.

Thousands of cousins have  turned up via various genetic testing services.  The labs propose generational distance.

Certain individuals share the same chromosome fragment(s).   Clearly segments over 6 cMs strongly indicate cousinage probability and the larger the segments the stronger the probability.  One can then infer that, the more segments shared, the stronger the cousinage probability.  But how does one read those segments to get the most out of the analysis?

GEDmatch provides  several Admixture analysis utilities which shows you the regional DNA sharing for each segment of  each chromosome.  What is the value in this if one can then determine that shared segments contain specific regional contributions, e.g. north-east Europe, West Asia etc?

There are likely to be other bits of wisdom the appropriate books or utilities could provide.

Where are they?

Thanks.

Ian

 

 

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Ancestry Overview

The new 23andMe features provided the revelation that in the past several hundred years my mother’s line had ancestry in Europe/the Near East.

This may be the first confirmation of something about a North African blood connection that my mother once alluded to in conversation with one of my brothers.  It also may provide the explanation of observation that my Mediterranean DNA is too great (around 45%) to be credited solely to my grandfather which should only be about 25%.

Also somewhat surprising is the reference to my father’s line still being found primarily in Africa.

Your Mother’s Line

Along your mother’s line, you have ancestry in Europe/the Near East in the past few hundred years, that traces back to eastern Africa around 50,000 years ago.

 

Your Father’s Line

Your father’s line was likely in eastern Africa 50,000 years ago. Today that line is still found primarily in Africa.

Your Overall Ancestry

It looks like all of your ancestors from the past few hundred years were of European/Near Eastern origin.

Ashkenazi Jewish Ancestry

It looks like you have some Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry. You share DNA with some 23andMe customers that have reported full Jewish ancestry.

And if it weren’t exotic enough there is the

Neanderthal Ancestry

You have an estimated 2.8% Neanderthal DNA, which puts you in the 85th percentile among Multi-regional 23andMe members.

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Geographical Origin of E1b1b1c1a M84

Given that the Time of the Most Recent Common Ancestor M84 was about 1515 BCE  (+/-650 years), it is hard to pinpoint the exact location of his birth. However, scientists estimate that it was within a region of about 20,000 sq km that stretched southwest to the Mediterranean from just over the Turkish/Syrian border at about Harran (home of Abraham).

By comparison, that is an area about the same size as Israel, Sardinia, Sicily or Massachusetts; twice the size of Lebanon or Cyprus; and 4 times the size of PEI but 1/4 the size of Ireland or the island of Newfoundland. It is also slightly larger than the triangular area from Toronto to Kingston to Ottawa.

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Geographical Associations of Chromosomes

My chromosomes can be shown to be in common with the pool of individuals of specific geographic regions who have been tested. In theory, my genetic makeup should be 75% Western European–mother (50%) and my father’s mother (25%). However, it is only 45% which means that my English mother and Scottish grandmother would have some explaining to do, were they still alive.

Since our narrow current quest is to explain my “orphan” grandfather, I have extracted all Western European from the admixtures calculated from each chromosome, and dubbed the residual to be 100%. The non-Western European contributions distribute themselves as follows, although the weighting in each chromosome varies significantly. I will add that table when I can get it to present clearly here.

Removing 100% of Western Europe
New Weighting

East_European 29.6%
West_European
Mediterranean 44%
Neo_African 0.2%
West_Asian 11.3%
South_Asian 2.3%
Northeast_Asian 1.0%
Southeast_Asian 0.7%
East_African 0.5%
Southwest_Asian 6.7%
Northwest_African 3.5%
Palaeo_African 0.4%
100%

Source: 23andMe Admixture Analysis

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Proposed Cousins MASTER List – These Cousin Relationships Are Probable But Remain To Be Verified & The Links Are Unknown

As more have their DNA analyzed there are more cousins being proposed by various organizations. I am currently using 23andMe, GEDmatch and ftDNA. As well, I am using MyHeritage for family tree (GEDCOM) development. there are others but these are the primary ones. I will update the list from time to time.

I have decided to put up this master list of the most promising names in order to attract others who are searching and may have parts of the puzzle that we don’t have. Note that searches of specific family trees–such as the current most promising family tree managed by 4th cousin Daniela Mihailovici–will get their own postings.

For Frank’s descendants coming to this page, remember that these matches–out of necessity–are to me and to Merle, Kevin and Brian since it is my DNA that was used. This means that all Frank’ and Molly’s descendants may be related but that since half my DNA is from my English mother then other descendants of Frank and Molly may NOT be related to these cousins. If one other of my cousins (Frank’s descendents) were to have their DNA tested then we could cross compare and determine if the DNA that matches each of these proposed cousins comes from Frank or Molly. That would reduce the search time required by weeding out those who are not related to Frank. I’m unaware of any other of Frank’s descendants having their DNA tested other than me, Brian, David and Jon.

ftDNA

2nd Cousin – 4th Cousin Step Match

Charlotte Kirk Lazell – contact established
Sandra (Raskin) Curcuru – contact established

3rd Cousin – 5th Cousin Step Match

Alexis Hillary Frankel – contact established
Brian Scott Politzer
Mitchell Adley Leon – contact established
Juri Alperovich – contact established via 3rd party cousin
Jewell Betty Andersen (nee Pick)  – contact established via 3rd party

Sasha Emily Ganz – contact established via 3rd party cousin
Ralph F Rothschild – contact established
Julie Bernsen Brook – contact established
Robin Kasch
Jamie Elyse Merriman-Cohen – contact established
Rayna Gillman – contact established
Gregory Lee Steinhauer  – contact established
Roger Wright Lamson
William Alan Schubert
Shirley Jean Collins Beane
Marsha Spector – contact established via 3rd party cousin
Helene Shulman Lorenz
Helmut Schwab
William Morris Yoffee – contact established
Harvey Morris Kabaker – contact established
Fred A Schreier
David Stephen Senzel – contact established
Gil Bardige
Sally Mizroch – contact established
Beatrice Ann Witter
Valerie Bunch Hollinger
Terri /Alexander Kahan

23andMe – 3rd-4th Cousin

Eugene Yurtsev – contact established
Alexander Lifanov – contact established
Karen Aziz
Nathanael Eisenberg

All of the names posted are unproven, unless otherwise indicated. They will be added to our GEDCOM and will be appropriately “qualified”.

NOTE: If anyone named above would prefer to be removed from the list, please let me know. The information posted above is available from other web sites that require members to opt in so that they can benefit from matching DNA analysis and family trees/GEDCOMs. Nonetheless, I wish to establish friendly relations with newly found relatives. We can agree to disagree later, once we really get to know each other!

This addition originated from my son, David, who opened up this DNA Pandora’s box. He pointed out to me the relative importance of propriety and enthusiasm. He deserves the credit as well as his mother who must have brought him up well.

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4th Cousin Daniela (Hora) Mihailovici and Her Family Tree – February 2012 Developments

UPDATE: March 10, 2012
So far the two names with the greatest promise are Pick and Rosenfeld, both families had members who immigrated through New York in the 1900 -10 yrs or + 6 years time frame.

An initial attempt to contact members of the Rosenfeld family has not yet yielded any contact.

See a separate posting for the Picks.

January 16, 2012 was a major development in our search for Frank’s roots and living relatives. I found a possible 4th cousin by the name of Daniela (Hora) Mihailovici. She manages a family tree that has more than 3,300 names on it. I am going through the tree to find branches with individuals who immigrated to the United States around 1890-1905. To date the most promising branches–at the time of immigration–are Pick and Rosenfeld. Eventually I will post the names of living descendants in the hope that someone can provide more information that will either validate or invalidate their inclusion as persons of interest.

Also, I’m attempting to find an easy and “clean” method of including promising names with our family tree on My Heritage Family Tree Builder. I want to mark them indicating that their inclusion is tentative since My Heritage makes regular evaluations in order to match up family trees that otherwise might be unaware of the existence of other family trees with the same people on them.

Names from Daniela’s tree that we are currently searching are:

SURNAMES – Strelinger, Pick, Brugler, Lorand, Landesman, Rosenfeld, Heitler/Hora.

FIRST NAMES – Francis, Frances, Frank; For his mother there is a high probability that the name is a variation on: Julia Yulia,YULIYA, Gyula.

FEMININE FORMS: Various LANGUAGES: Julia (Biblical), Júlia (Slovak), Julija (Slovene), Júlia, Juli, Juliska (Hungarian), Iulia (Romanian), Yuliya (Bulgarian), Julija (Croatian), Julia, Julita (Polish), YULIA, YULIYA (Russian) Julitta (History), Iúile (Irish), Giulia, Giulietta (Italian), Julija (Lithuanian), Júlia, Julinha (Portuguese), Julia (Scandinavian),Julia (Spanish), Iulia, Julia (Ancient Roman),

MASCULINE FORMS: Yuli, Yuliy

With those names we are assuming emigration from Eastern Europe to America through New York in the 1890s. American city locations include the regions of New York, Detroit and Chicago.

DNA comparison through GEDmatch has turned up a 3rd or 4th cousin, Daniela Mihailovici from Haifa, who has access to a family tree of more than 3,200 names. We have not had much time to determine what the route between us might be. Dana has suggested the name Landesman on her side might be the link. I have been poking around on her family tree but need her help to do more. In the meantime I have added a few of the names to our family tree on MyHeritage and it has connected me to yet other family trees which I am now exploring and examining with the site administrators.

My DNA connection with Daniela is quite strong with 11 segments over 10 chromosomes and a total of 61.6 cMs, the second most that has turned up to date for me. Naturally, she and I do not share the same haplogroup, so our connection could be either through my great grandmother or great grandfather. I have not been able to make a connection with the only stranger with an even stronger linkage.

I hope to be adding more confirmed information in March.

DNA comparisons can be made on GEDmatch, 23andMe and soon on ftDNA.

If you would like to know more details before then, then email me at ian@z33z.com .

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