Weil an Anagram for Levi? Weil … Spanish and Moroccan Sephardi?

New information has been discovered that indicates that Weil written in Hebrew is an anagram for Levi written in Hebrew.  This makes the Weils Levites.  This is further reinforced by a 23andMe report that states that among my DNA cousin matches the most numerous and weighted DNA match and ancestral name is Cohen.  The third largest is Levi.  The second largest is Rothschild.  It must be remembered that this calculation comes from the DNA samples that were voluntarily submitted, not from a scientific population study.

Also, new information has been discovered that places Weils in Spain and Morocco.

Weil/Weyl/Weill Anagram for Levi

What’s in a name? By Estee Rieder

“There are some that are even an anagram of an earlier family name; the name Weil in Hebrew (vov-yud-lamed) is an anagram of Levi (lamed-vav-yud).“

http://www.jewishworldreview.com/0807/names.php3

Several locations, including Wikipedia and a Moroccan Jewish name list, indicate that Weyl/Weil/Weill may have come as an anagram of the name Levi.  According to Jewish biblical history, the Cohens and the Levites were assigned specific tasks in the temple, and treated differently in other ways. That is consistent with the 900 page history that indicates that the Weils were a highly respected Rabbinical family.

Weil A Sephardi Name?

Weil is listed as a Sephardi name in the following documents:

  • http://www.sephardicgen.com/databases/SephardimCom2009.htm
  • http://www.sephardicgen.com/names.htm

Getting There: The Rationale

The analysis/search of the Sephardi connection started because one of my 2nd cousins Karen, also a descendant of Carl Henry Weil, was surprised when her DNA analysis showed 98% Ashkenazi. Her comment stirred my prior interest in a possible Weil Sephardi origin.  A comment in an excerpt from the 900 page family history suggested that the Weils were Sephardi although I gather there is no hard information on that point in that book.  The history also indicated that the author didn’t know where the name came from.  Apparently there are two rivers in Europe who’s names are spelled close to Weil. However, the family history also contains an unsubstantiated suggestion that the family originated in Valls, Tarragona, Spain not far south west from Barcelona.  It was a Jewish centre.  If true, that ups the probability almost to a certainty.

First, the naming conventions are different for the Ashkenazim than for the Sephardi.  The German web site Hohenems Genealogie (Jüdische Familiengeschichte in Vorarlberg und Tirol) which has extensive family tree information on the Weils.  Lo and behold, the Weils practiced the Sephardi convention where they named the first male and female children after a living family member, specifically grandparents.  Ashkenazim don’t, apparently. Furthermore, Sephardi have been using surnames from according to that convention going back to about the 12th C, when, of course, there were large numbers of Jews in Portugal, Spain and Morocco.  Ashkenazim didn’t really adopt surnames until the late 17th C to the mid-18th C when they were required to in Europe. The 900 page family history indicates that the Weil names goes way back in the Randegg family.

Also, both my 2nd Cousin Karen and I have significant Iberian and Mediterranean DNA, not in large amounts but sufficient to be unequivocal.   It appears in other DNA tests as well. I used a number of GEDmatch Admixture analysis apps with both my file and Karen’s which further confirmed a substantial Mediterranean connection.  I did not get it from my other three grandparents.

My Eastern European DNA can almost totally be attributed to my Polish great grandmother Juliana Lugiewicz who conceived my grandfather with Carl Weil on New Years Eve 1989.

 

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